2609 5th Ave     |       (206) 441-7984    |      MON-WED: 10am - 1pm & 3pm -7pm | THURS: 3pm - 7pm | FRI: Closed

ADJUST TO A PAIN FREE AND HEALTHY LIFESTYLE

Belltown Spine & Wellness has helped thousands of people over the past 25 years regain their health and vitality in Seattle.

NEW PATIENT SPECIAL: FREE CONSULTATION & COMPUTERIZED POSTURAL SCAN!
Seattle Chiropractor - Belltown Spine & Wellness
pain-free

NEW PATIENT SPECIAL: FREE CONSULTATION & COMPUTERIZED POSTURAL SCAN!

Belltown Spine & Wellness Services

Belltown Spine & Wellness is an integrated health and wellness center that has helped thousands of people regain their health and vitality in the greater Seattle area. Services are customized and targeted for each individual's health goals.  Dr. Scott Mindel, Seattle chiropractor and owner of Belltown Spine & Wellness, created the signature 4-step program that is specifically designed to help patients recover from chronic neck and back pain conditions along with using the latest rehabilitation techniques available today.

Corrective Chiropractic Care

Belltown Spine & Wellness practices the state-of-the-art Corrective Biophysics Technique using Mirror Image exercise, adjusting and postural traction to correct the spine, and posture deviations back towards normal alignment and balance. Founder, Dr. Scott Mindel's 4-step Method has helped his patients restore overall health for over two decades in Seattle.

Massage Therapy

Belltown Spine & Wellness offers different types of massage to best suit individual client needs and preferences, including deep tissue, Swedish, and Manual Ligament Therapy, sports massage, lymphatic drainage, Healing Touch, trigger point therapy, reflexology, craniosacral, intra-oral, and pre-natal massage.

Naturopathic Medicine & Acupuncture

Holistic medicine is a form of healing that considers the body, mind, spirit, and emotions in the quest for optimal health and wellness do one can achieve optimal health by gaining proper balance in life. Naturopathic medicine, acupuncture and chiropractors target the root cause of an issue as opposed to simply reducing or managing symptoms.
STOP WAITING. SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION TODAY!

Our Seattle Chiropractors & Doctor

Dr. Scott Mindel

Dr. Scott Mindel

Doctor of Chiropractic
Dr. Gion Monn

Dr. GION MONN

Doctor of Chiropractic
Dr. Julie Sutton

Dr. Julie Sutton

Naturopathic Doctor / Licensed Acupuncturist

[title]

New research published in the September issue of the British Journal of Nutrition and featured in the just released Global Phytonutrient Report highlights

a significant shortfall in fruit and vegetable consumption in people's diets around the world. Commissioned by the Nutrilite Health Institute of Amway, the research finds the majority of adults worldwide would have to at least double their current consumption of fruits and vegetables to meet the World Health Organization's minimum recommendation of five servings (400 grams) per day. Additionally, the vast majority of adults worldwide – 60 to 87 percent across 13 geographic diet regions – are falling short of this recommendation and missing out on crucial nutrition and health benefits.

The gap between the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables and what adults are actually eating also indicates that most adults worldwide are not receiving the quantity or variety of phytonutrients – organic compounds found in fruits and vegetables – potentially needed to support their health and wellness. While specific recommendations for phytonutrient consumption levels have not yet been established uniformly worldwide, a growing body of research suggests that eating foods rich in phytonutrients may provide a range of health benefits, from promoting eye, bone and heart health, to supporting immune and brain function. Many phytonutrients are powerful antioxidants that can help fight the damage caused to our bodies' cells over time.

"Insights from the research highlight a global need for increased awareness of the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption, and phytonutrient intakes," said Keith Randolph, Ph.D., nutrition technology strategist at the Nutrilite Health Institute and co-author of the research published in the British Journal of Nutrition.

The Effect of Low Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Availability on Phytonutrient Intake
The research examined the impact of low fruit and vegetable consumption on phytonutrient intake in each of the 13 regions under study. This examination found adults consuming five or more daily servings of fruits and vegetables had two to six times the average intake of phytonutrients of adults consuming fewer than five servings per day.

Additionally, the research looks at the variety and availability of fruits and vegetables in each of the regions. It shows that phytonutrient intake estimates vary considerably across some regions, a reflection of limited availability of some fruits and vegetables. Key findings include :

  • European Regions: When compared to other regions, adults in European regions, in particular Northern Europe, likely have high intakes of alpha-carotene and beta-carotene, attributable in part to the relative high availability of carrots. These phytonutrients are known to support healthy growth and development.
  • Asian Regions: Adults in Asia, which includes China and India, likely have relatively low intakes of ellagic acid due to the limited availability of berries. Ellagic acid is shown to be vital to cell health.
  • South/Central America: Adults in South/Central America likely have relatively low intakes of lutein and zeaxanthin – phytonutrients thought to be crucial to healthy vision – relative to adults in Asia or Northern Europe.
  • All Regions: Fruiting vegetables (e.g. tomatoes and corn) and tropical and subtropical fruits (e.g. plantains and bananas) are among the most commonly available vegetables and fruits across most regions. Given this, adults worldwide consuming fruits and vegetables will likely receive some level of lycopene, which supports heart health, as well as alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and lutein/zeaxanthin.

"Both the amount and variety of fruits and vegetables in a person's diet are important," said Mary Murphy, MS, RD, senior managing scientist at Exponent, Inc. and co-author of the study. "In order to consume a range of phytonutrients people should aim to meet recommended intakes of fruits and vegetables and eat an assortment of fruits and vegetables."

Factors Contributing to Low Phytonutrient Intake
Dr. Randolph acknowledges that busy lives, cost, seasonal and geographic availability, as well as perceptions of the value of fruits and vegetables as a food source, could all influence people's consumption of fruits and vegetables, and ultimately phytonutrients.

"No matter where they live, many adults today lead busy and active lives and/or may have limited access to some fruits and vegetables," said Randolph. "That's why it's important for adults to eat whole foods, including fruits and vegetables, whenever possible. But when availability is limited or diet is not enough, dietary supplementation may be an option for individuals looking to increase their phytonutrient consumption," added Randolph.

The study is published online at journals.cambridge.org/BJN/phytonutrient and will appear in the September print issue of the British Journal of Nutrition.

SOURCE Amway

DID WE MENTION A FREE CONSULTATION TO BE PAIN FREE?